Infant Health

Breastfeeding, Bottles, Pacifiers and Your Baby’s Teeth

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  How you feed your baby affects not only overall health but also your child’s risk of tooth decay. Some babies continue to suck — on a bottle, pacifier or other object — long after it’s needed for nutrition. This habit also can affect how your child’s teeth line up. But following simple tips about feeding and mouth care can ... Read More »

Cleaning Your Child’s Mouth and Teeth

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  From Mouth Wipes to Brushing and Flossing As with any other part of your child’s body, your child’s mouth needs to be cleaned regularly to keep it healthy, working properly and looking good. If your child’s mouth is clean and healthy, the rest of his or her body will be better off, too. Oral hygiene needs to start early. ... Read More »

Your Child’s Mouth

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  The Primary Teeth When infants are born, almost all of their primary (baby) teeth already have formed. These teeth are still hidden in the gums. They usually begin to erupt (come through the gums) at about 6 months of age. Some babies get teeth earlier, and some get them later. Usually, the two bottom front teeth come in first. ... Read More »

Decayed Baby Teeth — Save Them or Pull Them?

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  Your child’s dentist has had the same conversation many times. Dentist: “Your son, John, has a very large cavity in his second primary molar. To save the tooth, I will have to do a root canal and place a crown.” Parent: “Doc, it’s a just baby tooth. Why don’t you pull it?” The reaction is a common one because ... Read More »

6 Steps to a Healthier Smile

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February is National Children’s Dental Health Month, a campaign sponsored by the American Dental Association (ADA) to raise awareness about the importance of oral health. According to the ADA, baby teeth are just as important as permanent teeth because they help children chew and speak as well as hold space in the jaw for the permanent teeth that are developing ... Read More »

Your Child’s Mouth

shutterstock_348201527

  The Primary Teeth When infants are born, almost all of their primary (baby) teeth already have formed. These teeth are still hidden in the gums. They usually begin to erupt (come through the gums) at about 6 months of age. Some babies get teeth earlier, and some get them later. Usually, the two bottom front teeth come in first. ... Read More »

Your Child’s Age 1 Dental Visit

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  Overview New parents often ask, “When should my child first see a dentist?” The short answer is “First visit by first birthday.” That’s the view of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry. Pediatricians agree. The American Academy of Pediatrics suggests that children who are at risk of early childhood cavities visit a pediatric dentist by age 1. The idea ... Read More »

Your Infant’s Mouth

    Teeth at Birth? Soon after an infant is born, a doctor or nurse practitioner thoroughly examines his or her body, including the mouth. Most of the time a baby’s gums, tongue and soft palate are normally developed and ready for action. But sometimes there are harmless variations that may surprise some parents. Epstein’s pearls — These small, white, ... Read More »

The Benefits of Breastfeeding

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, promotes breastfeeding as a practice that improves the health and well-being of mothers and infants.   The American Association of Pediatrics recommends that until six months of age, an infant should only be fed breast milk. In 2011, 79% of mothers started breastfeeding their child ... Read More »