5 Mental Mistakes Women Make at the Gym

women working out itriageWomen who love to work out are constantly shadowed by obstacles they cannot shake! They will most likely not achieve their workout goals because they are not preparing themselves enough mentally for the many challenges ahead.

That’s the view of leading sports therapist Carla Lundblade who works with some of the country’s top professional sports stars and celebrities from her practice in Beverly Hills. She believes women who are happy and healthy are taking better measures to coach themselves psychologically.

“Sports psychologists and therapists have studied MRI scans which show how important emotions and mental imagery are to the physical gift of an athlete,” added Carla Lundblade. “The brain is naturally negative and will operate on a sub conscious level. That’s why mental brain training is so crucial. We train the brain to automatically replace the negativity – and it works!”

The challenges facing most women include:

1. Feeling fragile/low self confidence: A problem that has everything to do with mental skills training and requires regular positive reinforcement coaching.

2. Fear of failure/loss of social approval: Women are highly affected by what other people think of them and their performance. “I’ve seen women quit due to the fear, it’s a travesty,” says Carla Lundblade.

3. High expectations: Putting too high an expectation on themselves and not achieving their own goals is another reason women have low self esteem. Carla Lundblade says a small hiccup can plague a whole workout and training program.  “When we have a bad experience a mental block is developed. We can train the brain to associate the right image to overcome this.”

4. Perfectionism: No one is perfect, says Carla Lundblade, and having the ability to move forward and accept failure is critical. “Most top sports achievers will tell you their performance is either ‘perfect’ or ‘awful’ there is no in between. Women need coaching or a group of friends to help them deal with failure and repackage it to their benefit.”

5. Trust: This is more to do with not trusting themselves than others, explains Carla Lundblade. “The reason may be down to what they are doing during their time off that no one knows about, which will overflow into their performance. They may be feeling stressed and to relieve that stress will go out partying. Alcohol and drug use is a common way to relieve stress; however, a woman then becomes preoccupied worrying about how this will affect her workout motivation. It causes a breach of trust within themselves thus lowering self confidence.”

“A great hallmark for every woman is a desire to improve herself. Women can incorporate brain training techniques very quickly,” added Carla Lundblade. “The bottom line is that mental skills training make their training programs better and will give them a competitive edge.”

carla lundblade itriageCarla Lundblade received her BS in psychology and graduated Summa Cum Laude from Southern Oregon University. She received her MS in Applied Psychology with a Concentration in Mental Health Counseling from Southern Oregon University. Carlahas been consulting with athletes, jury trial attorneys and performers since 2006. Athletes, teams, and coaches of all ages, ability levels, and sports have sought Carla’s services. She has also worked with performing artists. Carla has given numerous regional presentations at professional conferences and has been a guest speaker at several coaching clinics throughout the U.S. She is currently the Subject Matter Expert and Chief Lecturer for The Successful Interplay Between Professional Sports Careers and Sports Psychology: A Clinical Perspective of a Winning Combination and Psychodrama, Creativity and the Training of Jury Trial Attorneys. In addition, she has worked as a Co-Presenter for the Mental Skills and Mental Strategies Lead to Maximum Performance training workshops and has been a dedicated fundraising volunteer for TACA (Talking about Curing Autism) through her work with celebrity charity events. Her professional affiliations include the Association for Applied Sport Psychology (AASP) and the American Mental Health Counselors Association (AMHCA).

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